1.7 Million Dollars

Questioner: Anonymous

Posed to: Pamela Chally, Interim Provost and VP of Academic Affairs

 

Is it true that Dean Rainbolt “found” 1.7 million dollars that had gone unaccounted for in his college?

Where were these funds found and how is it possible they were not known of all along?

Could these funds have been put to use in hiring faculty and adjuncts rather than having departments going directly to Academic Affairs to ask for funds to put on courses?

Could the use of these funds for instructional purposes have facilitated an increase in graduation rates and perhaps retention as well?

Is it true that Dean Rainbolt discussed with the COAS chairs the possibility of using these funds for faculty and staff raises?

Would such plans not involve circumventing the contract, the union, and human resources?

Would such plans not exacerbate pay inequities across the university as a whole?

What is the responsibility of Academic Affairs for oversight over the budgetary workings of COAS?

Will Provost Chally continue to allow Dean Rainbolt to hold classes teaching members of his college about budgets? 

Does Provost Chally accept these developments as evidence of budgetary incompetence and will this evidence be used in her decision concerning the strong vote of no-confidence in Dean Rainbolt?

Response in writing by Provost Chally:

The dollars are being reviewed.   Most were known about and regularly used to pay for summer school.   Dr. Rainbolt is aware that faculty raises are not possible without Union negotiation and there was no intent, whatsoever, to circumvent UFF.  All College budgets are overseen through Dan Moon and Anne Hoover, including the COAS budget. The budget classes Dean Rainbolt is teaching do not specifically discuss how to “find” money or what to do once “found.”

Instructional Resources

February 7, 2019

Questioner: Anonymous

Posed to: Pam Chally, Interim Provost and VP of Academic Affairs

Dean Rainbolt seems obsessed with money. His recent policies, his new (very complex) budget spreadsheets, the new class he is offering on budgeting, and the fact that he has TWO staff members in his office who are either exclusively or principally focused on budgeting seem to have pushed out all focus on other things. Despite this, or perhaps because of it, the resources that are distributed for instruction, especially visitor positions, have diminished under his leadership. This is felt acutely in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics. Is it true that on a number of occasions the chair of that department felt compelled to approach Academic Affairs directly for instructional resources necessary to provide students with the courses they need to progress or graduate?

Response from the floor by Interim Provost Chally

Interim Provost Chally stated Dr. Patterson is a strong advocate for more lines for the department. To the best of her knowledge, that has always occurred in the presence of Dean Rainbolt.

Dean Rainbolt’s Budgeting Class

February 7, 2019

Questioner: Anonymous

Posed to: Dr. George Rainbolt, COAS Dean

Dean Rainbolt has invited all COAS faculty to take a class that he is offering on budgeting. The class is four hours long plus additional time for “homework”.
(1) Is this the best use of faculty time? How does this advance the President’s focus on student success? Does such a class not take faculty time and attention away from teaching, learning, research, and scholarship?
(2) Since Administration and Finance through the Center for Professional Development and Training offers classes on budgeting, how is what Dr. Rainbolt is offering not a duplication of efforts?
(3) Is there not a real danger that what Dr. Rainbolt will teach about budgeting will contradict UNF policy or procedure? Is there not a danger that Dr. Rainbolt’s class will contradict, wholly or partially, what is taught in UNF’s official budgeting classes?

Dean Rainbolt has invited all COAS faculty to take a class that he is offering on budgeting. The class is four hours long plus additional time for “homework”.
(1) Is this the best use of faculty time? How does this advance the President’s focus on student success? Does such a class not take faculty time and attention away from teaching, learning, research, and scholarship?
(2) Since Administration and Finance through the Center for Professional Development and Training offers classes on budgeting, how is what Dr. Rainbolt is offering not a duplication of efforts?
(3) Is there not a real danger that what Dr. Rainbolt will teach about budgeting will contradict UNF policy or procedure? Is there not a danger that Dr. Rainbolt’s class will contradict, wholly or partially, what is taught in UNF’s official budgeting classes?

Response from the floor by Dean Rainbolt

Dean Rainbolt stated that he and 20 faculty members plan to discuss the budget. All are welcome to attend. Dean Rainbolt stated that budget transparency is important, particularly in light of the SUS Metrics. Dean Rainbolt stated that participants in the class are well versed in best practices in budgeting. Dean Rainbolt intends to focus on budgeting on a national level first to identify best practices as part of the budget initiative, and then move the discussion to local foci.

COAS Extra Budget Proposal

Questioner: Anonymous

Posted to: Pamela S. Chally, Interim Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs

As a Faculty Member in COAS, we were mandated by Academic Affairs and our Dean to put together an extensive extra budget proposal for our Department because of the anticipated Performance Metric Money of up to 12 million dollars. We are now told by our Chair and Dean that UNF will receive NO money because UNF finished last in these metrics.

Why did Academic Affairs mandate this budget exercise BEFORE we knew we were getting any money? This is terrible for faculty morale.

Response from the Floor by Provost Chally

We thought we were going to receive money. The process was based on the need for Academic Affairs to be prepared for this anticipated money. In the future, we will be more careful in calling for these activities.

Electronic P&T Dossier Software

Questioner: Anonymous

Posted to: John Delaney, President University of North Florida & Earle Traynham, Provost Academic Affairs

Given the budget issues discussed in President Delaney’s message from the President on February 29th, is the administration/UNF Faculty Association still considering the electronic P&T dossier software, which has an estimated recurring cost of $25,000 per year?

Response from Earle Traynham, Provost & Vice President for the Academic Affairs:

Dear Chairs,

We will not be able to purchase and implement any electronic P&T software for this next cycle. Earlier in the year, I was hopeful that it might be possible to select, purchase and implement an electronic dossier system for this fall. However, it has not worked out. First, the ITN process took longer than expected. The task force did an excellent job of reviewing and evaluating the available alternatives, and has recently made their recommendation. They also negotiated a “Best Final Offer” from the vendor. However, there is not adequate time to ask everyone one who plans to go up for promotion and/or tenure this fall to adopt the e-dossier software, even if we had it today. Given the tight budget situation facing the university for this next year, it is also unclear if we should make this investment at this time. For these reasons, it is best to continue with our traditional dossier process relying on binders.

We are continuing to investigate the possibility of purchasing the electronic P&T software, with the hope of implementing it in the future. I would appreciate it if you would inform anyone in your department who might be preparing their dossier for P&T to proceed with the traditional process.

Thanks for your help with this.

Earle

Inertia costs

Questioner: Anonymous

Posted to: Earle Traynham, Provost & Vice President Academic Affairs

Can the Provost please explain the so-called inertia costs in Academic Affairs that are needed for next year’s budget?

Response from Earle Traynham, Provost & Vice President, Academic Affairs:

“Inertia” costs may be classified as Recurring and Non-Recurring.

Recurring include: promotion increases (this year $420,875), continuing to replace long-term visiting positions, which are in violation of the CBA, with regular faculty (this year $253,820), two additional faculty required to address accreditation concerns (this year $174,825), extra salary rate required to replace 2 deans (this year estimated to be $129,500), stipend increases for department chairs approaching 8 years of service (this year $5180), electronic P&T dossier software (estimated to be $25,000). These commitments total $1,009,200. There are additional commitments that have been made against recurring dollars, but most of these are related to enrollment growth which will provide additional tuition to cover the projected costs. Of course, the total required varies from one year to the next, but this year is not atypical.

Non-Recurring include: startup funds, mostly in the sciences and engineering (estimated to be $500,000), accreditation support (estimated to be $250,000), Assessment expenses (estimated to be $50,000), Scantrons (estimated to be $20,000), Visiting faculty (estimated to be $800,000), Adjunct/overload expense (estimated to be $1,270,000), Transformational Learning Opportunities ($300,000), equipment budget ($300,000). These commitments total $3,490,000. As with the recurring funds, the total varies somewhat from year to year, and there are always some additional non-recurring items which are not required.

These recurring and non-recurring commitments are pretty standard each year, and total about $4.5 million. Given these commitments, it is easy to see why we do not want to be in the bottom three on the metrics and receive no new money.

Carnegie Community Engagement

Questioner: Anonymous

Posted to: Mark Falbo, Director Center for Community-Based Learning

Is UNF charged either on a yearly basis or when we apply for the Carnegie Community Engagement Classification?

Response from Mark Falbo, Director of the Center for Community-Based Learning:

There are no annual costs/dues for maintaining the Carnegie community engagement designation. At the time we applied in 2010 there were no administrative charges or fees.  I have heard unconfirmed rumors within the community engagement directors network that there MAY be an administrative application fee for those reapplying in 2020. I can confirm that the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching is transferring management of the designation to Indiana University Bloomington’s Center for Postsecondary Research by January 1, 2015. The classification will continue to retain the Carnegie name after the Center for Postsecondary Research takes over responsibility on Jan. 1.

On an annual basis we also apply and have received distinction from the Corporation for National and Community Service who manages the President¹s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll.  There are no costs or fees associated with this designation/award process outside of the staff time to prepare the application.

In terms of recurring expenses, UNF does hold several institutional memberships eparticularly to facilitate faculty access to the community of scholars in engaged scholarship. One such organization is Florida Campus Compact,http://www.floridacompact.org, (which includes membership in the national Campus Compact organization). Because Florida Campus Compact is an association of college and university presidents, these dues are paid by the President¹s Office.  We also receive considerable technical support from our state Campus Compact office, including funds for programs, like the community-based learning and STEM Institute offered in 2012. The President¹s office also maintains membership in the Coalition of Urban and Metropolitan Universities (CUMU).

The Center for Community-Based Learning pays and holds membership in the Engaged Scholarship Consortium (http://engagementscholarship.org) and also maintains memberships in the Association for Experiential Learning, International Association for Research in Service Learning and Community Engagement (http://www.researchslce.org), and Breakaway, an organization dedicated to the promotion of alternative breaks programs (http://www.alternativebreaks.org).

I believe the College of Health or the School of Nursing also maintains membership in Campus-Communities Partnership in Health (CCPH) (http://ccph.memberclicks.net).

In the past few years, the CCBL has supported more than a dozen faculty members, students, UNF staff, and community partners to present peer-reviewed presentations or poster sessions at conferences sponsored by the six organizations referenced above. If needed, I can provide more ROI information related to our memberships in these organizations and the impact on faculty engagement scholarship.

I hope this information is helpful.

Director Title Usage

Questioner: Anonymous

Posted to: Thomas Serwatka, Vice President & Chief of Staff to the President

A question was asked on February 6th regarding the over-administration of UNF. Dr. Serwatka responded on March 13th that the title of “director” had been used too freely. He indicated that the UNF HR department and Institutional Research department needed to make a change so that administration is accurately counted. As a follow-up to this, 1) Has this process been started in an effort to resolve the misperception that Dr. Serwatka identifies? 2) Should the Budget Advisory Committee be involved in this process?

 

Response from Vice President & Chief of Staff to the President, Dr. Thomas Serwatka:

October 22, 2014

Dear President Klostermeyer,

Based on our correspondence, I understand that you received a question about what progress we had made in readjusting the use of the title director, differentiating those directors whose role is 75% or more administrative from those directors who are direct service providers, and whether faculty could help in resolving this issue.

I am happy to report that, with the help of Human Resources, we have resolved the different interpretations of director, separating directors who hold administrative positions and those who hold direct service provider positions.

In examining the responsibilities of the 229 employees who were classified as directors or assistant directors under an administrative code, we were able to determine that 110 should be classified as program directors or under other non-administrative titles.  These changes in classification have been made and are reflected in the latest files we have submitted to the Board of Governors staff.

If any faculty committee is interested in greater detail on our review process, we will be happy to meet with them.

Respectfully,

Tom

Tuition Benefit Policy

Questioner: Anonymous

Posted to: Shari Shuman, Vice President Administration & Finance

Has UNF revisited the tuition benefit policy for spouses and faculty members?

Response from Vice President Shari Shuman, Administration & Finance:

Every year during the budget process, we review the tuition benefit policy for employees, their spouses and dependents.  Over the last 11 years, we have added benefits to cover undergraduate education for spouses and dependents, and then added graduate courses.  We allow the employee/spouse/dependent to register early for classes (as opposed to day before classes begin) to provide access to any course.  Please understand this is not the same as auditing a class.  We take money out of the E&G budget to cover the cost of tuition for the employee/spouse/dependent.  The tuition is not waived.  This is hard dollars in the budget.

Please let me know if you have any questions or need additional information.

Shari Shuman

VP, Administration and Finance

University of North Florida

1 UNF Drive

Jacksonville, FL  32224

904-620-4727

Records request

Questioner: Anonymous

Posted to: Shari Shuman, Vice President Administration & Finance

This is a public records request, going back ten years, for a year-by-year comparison of the amount of the budget allocated to the different categories covering the maintenance and improvement of the campus flora.

Response from Shari Shuman, Vice-President of Administration and Finance:

I apologize for the delay in responding.  Had John Hale put together the information and then forgot to send.  Below is the response.  Let me know if you have any questions.

 

Below is the amount spent on all grounds and landscaping maintenance expenses and special projects for the past 10 years.

 

 FY E&G  Carry Forward
2005 $              798,076  $                          –
2006 $              784,483  $              156,576
2007 $              936,310  $                66,078
2008 $           1,064,864  $              176,917
2009 $           1,005,012  $                 69,860
2010 $              989,575  $              154,091
2011 $           1,044,995  $              298,698
2012 $           1,159,680  $              227,882
2013 $           1,188,341  $              134,516
2014 YTD $              875,632  $              168,812

 

As an example, the breakout for fiscal year 2013 between materials, labor and projects follows:

 

Routine Grounds Materials, Supplies, Contracted Services: $233,053

Labor: $955,288

Special Projects & Enhancements: $134,516

 

Shari Shuman

VP, Administration and Finance

University of North Florida

1 UNF Drive

Jacksonville, Fl  32224

904-620-4727